CULTURE

While Bhutan is one of the smallest countries in the world, its cultural diversity and richness are profound. As such, strong emphasis is laid on the promotion and preservation of its unique culture. By protecting and nurturing Bhutan’s living culture it is believed that it will help guard the sovereignty of the nation.

EATING HABITS

eating habits Traditionally dishes were cooked in earthenware, but with the easy availability of modern goods, pots and pans have largely replaced their use. A typical Bhutanese meal consists of rice, a dish of EmaDatshi, the country’s favourite dish of chili and cheese, pork, beef curry or lentils.It is usually women who serve the food and in most cases, the mother. Before eating, a short prayer is offered and a small morsel placed on the floor as an offering to the local spirits and deities. With modernization, eating habits have changed and in urban areas, people usually eat with cutlery whilst seated at a regular dining table. Traditionally dishes were cooked in earthenware, but with the easy availability of modern goods, posts and pans have largely replaced their use. A typical Bhutanese meal consist of rice, a dish of Ema Datshi, the country's favourite dish of chili and cheese, pork, beef curry or lentils.

BIRTH

birth
The birth of a child is always welcomed. In Bhutan extended family and guests are discouraged from visiting during the first three days after the birth.On the third day, a short purification ritual is performed after which visitors are welcomed to visit the new born and mother. Bhutanese value children as progenitors of the future and therefore do not discriminate on the sex of the child. Traditionally various gifts are offered ranging from dairy products to cloth and money. The child is not immediately named; this responsibility is usually entrusted to the head lama (Buddhist priest) of the local temple. The mother and child will also receive blessings from the local deity (natal deity) and it was traditional that the name associated with the deity is given. In some cases, the child is given the name of the day on which the child is born. Based on the Bhutanese calendar, a horoscope is written based on the time and date of the birth, this will detail the various rituals to be performed at different times in the life of the child and to an extent predict his or her future.

MARRIAGE

marriage
Until just a few decades ago arranged marriages were common and many married among their relatives. In eastern Bhutan cross-cousin marriages were also once common, however, this practice is now becoming less common place among the literate masses and most marriages are based on the choice of the individuals. Marriages are simple affairs and are usually kept low-key. However, elaborate rituals are performed for lasting unions between the bride and the bridegroom. As the religious ceremony comes to an end, parents, relatives and friends of the couple present the newlyweds with traditional offerings of scarves along with gifts in the form of cash and goods. In the Western Bhutan, it was commonplace that the husband goes to live in his wife’s house after marriage while the practice in Eastern Bhutan is for the wife to move into the husband’s home. Of course, the newlyweds may also choose to live on their own. Divorce is also an accepted norm and carries no ignominy or disgrace within the country.

BHUTANESE DRESS

bhutanese dress

One of the most distinctive features of the Bhutanese is their traditional dress. One of the most distinctive features of the Bhutanese is their traditional dress, unique garments that have evolved over thousands of years. Men wear the Gho, a knee-length robe somewhat resembling a kimono that is tied at the waist by a traditional belt known as Kera. The pouch t which forms at the front traditionally was used for carrying food bowls and a small dagger. Today however it is more accustomed to carrying small articles such as wallets, mobile phones and Doma (beetle nut). Women wear the Kira, a long, ankle-length dress accompanied by a light outer jacket known as a Tego with an inner layer known as a Wonju. However, tribal and semi-nomadic people like the Bramis and Brokpas of eastern Bhutan generally wear clothing that differs from the rest of the Bhutanese population. The Brokpas and the Bramis both wear dresses woven either out of Yak or Sheep hair. Bhutanese still wear long scarves when visiting Dzongs and other administrative centers. The scarves worn vary in color, signifying the wearer’s status or rank. The scarf worn by men is known as Kabney while those worn by women are known as Rachus. Below is a brief breakdown of the different kabneys and their associated rank. The Rachu is hung over a woman’s shoulder and unlike the scarves worn by men, does not have any specific rank associated with its color. Rachus ar usually woven out of raw silk and embroidered with beautiful rich patterns
Rank Kabney/Scarf
The King Yellow
Je Khenpo (Head Abbot) Yellow
Minister Orange
Judge Green
District Administrator Red with a small white stripe
Commoner White

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CULTURE

While Bhutan is one of the smallest countries in the world, its cultural diversity and richness are profound. As such, strong emphasis is laid on the promotion and preservation of its unique culture. By protecting and nurturing Bhutan’s

NATURE

Despite its small landmass Bhutan has a remarkable abundance of flora and fauna and is one of the most biologically diverse regions of the world. The terrain is incredibly rugged and there are huge variations in altitude.

SPIRITUAL & WELLNESS

Bhutan has many activities available for those visitors seeking a place of solace, rest and recuperation. Whether it’s a session of peaceful, contemplative meditation, a relaxing soak in a mineral hot spring bath or the all natural

BHUTAN-Land Of Happiness ?

Welcome to Glorious Bhutan-where happiness is place.

Located between India and China with a population of just over 700,000 spread over 38,394 kmsq is the Kingdom of Bhutan. The term Bhutan has been derived from the Sanskrit Bhu-utan meaning “High land”. Bhutan has many names given by different people depending on the its location and features. Internationally known is “Bhutan” and locally known is “Druk” meaning thunder dragon.
Bhutan is the place of sacredness where great Saint Guru Padmasambhava visited Bhutan in 8th century to subdue demons, making them the guardians of religion, blessed the sites .



Clients Testimonials

WHY VISIT BHUTAN?

BHUTAN is said to be last Shangrila on earth. We are proud of:



OUR KINGS

The Great Wangchuck Dynasty is the real reason for being such a special country. Kings fought for the country and thinks about happiness of its People(Gross National Happiness). No words can ever describe quality of kings we have.

CARBON SINK

Bhutan mandate to have atleast 60% forest cover all times to come. Currently its forest coverage is more than 74%. Bhutan is not merely Carbon-Neutral,it's also Carbon Sink as Country's forest absorb more carbon dioxide each year than its sources of pollution, such as factories, emit.

PEOPLE

People of Bhutan are spiritually rich. Almost all are Buddhist and strongly believe in Karma(Cause and effect). This prompt them to be kind to all. Kind people are closer to enlightenment and are expected to reborn in better environment in next life.